Sinology Sunday: April 16, 2017

This week, we move past the Qing Dynasty and into the Republican era with Mr. Chen’s Chinese Photo Studio 陳先生的復古照相館.  Moving past this period will put us right up to the Modern Era and thus concludes our look though time.  Also, I apologize for the text in the middle of a few of the images.

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Sinology Sunday: April 9, 2017

This week, we move past the Ming dynasty and into the images I have been able to find for the Qing Dynasty with Mr. Chen’s Chinese Photo Studio 陳先生的復古照相館.

The drastic change in clothing style during the Qing dynasty is mostly attributed to the Queue Order which forced Chinese men to adopt the Manchurian hair style and officials to wear Manchu clothing.  This was one of the few Manchu customs that were imposed on the general population.  However, it is notable that the Manchu did in term heavily adopt Chinese customs and become sinicized to the point where the Manchu language is in danger of extinction.  This will be the last imperial dynasty.

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Sinology Sunday: April 2, 2017

This week, move on past the Yuan Dynasty and into the Ming dynasty with Mr. Chen’s Chinese Photo Studio 陳先生的復古照相館.  The Yuan Dynasty was a period of Mongol rule over China and although I am sure Hanfu still existed through this era, I have not been able to find many examples of it in terms of pictures.

The Ming dynasty marks the return of rule of China to Han Chinese people and some of the conservatism seems to have persisted into this era.  Note the collars of the first two pictures in comparison to the rest of the images.  If I remember correctly, the higher collar was eventually adopted with the capital moving from the Southern capital of Nanjing to the Northern capital of Beijing where it is colder.

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Sinology Sunday: March 26, 2017

This week we move on from the Tang Dynasty and through the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period into the Song dynasty with Mr. Chen’s Chinese Photo Studio 陳先生的復古照相館.

Clothing from the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period for the most part seems to have been a bit of a transition between the Tang and Song Dynasties.  The Song Dynasty seems to be more of a conservative period (note the colors used for clothes) and is when the practice of Foot Binding became more popular.

This is probably reflected a bit in the clothes with the abandoning of wide and billowing sleeves from past periods since foot binding made walking less steady and the last thing you want is to be juggling huge sleeves if walking alone was a difficult.  The sway of the body created by foot binding was mimicked by the shoes worn Huapenxie 花盆鞋 or Matixie 馬蹄鞋 worn by Manchu women during the Qing Dynasty (See original Sinology Sunday post on this topic)

More pictures below the cut.

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