Sinology Sunday: December 6, 2015

Early Eastern Han Dynasty.  Looks like zhiju to me.

This week, we take a look into more Han dynasty-inspired clothing and clothes pre-dating the Tang dynasty.  Pictures this week come from Clothing and Happiness 裝束與樂舞.  Each of the pictures will be labeled with the general time period they are attributed to and possibly some more details.  I will try to keep them in order.  Most of the pictures come from the Eastern Han Dynasty, the State of Wei during the Three Kingdoms periodJin Dynasty, and the Sixteen Kingdoms period.

More pictures below the cut.

The following are some links that may help you get some background information.  Please let us know in the comment section if there are any other sites you may be able to recommend for more pictures.

Chinese History Timeline

General Chinese Clothing Timeline

Hanfu: General Information, Hanfu List

Make-up: Lips, Eyebrows

Late Eastern Han dynasty. As I mentioned last week, with innovations in clothing (underwear), clothing changed drastically during the later Eastern Han dynasty.

Late Eastern Han dynasty.  Also notice how people started wearing lighter clothes and colors due to said improvements and outside influence.

Late Eastern Han dynasty.

Late Eastern Han dynasty, Three Kingdoms, and Jin dynasty.  This general style of dress seems to have persisted from the late Eastern Han dynasty, through the Three Kingdoms period, and into the Jin dynasty.

Late Eastern Han dynasty, Three Kingdoms, and Jin dynasty.

Late Eastern Han dynasty, Three Kingdoms, and Jin dynasty.

Late Eastern Han dynasty, Three Kingdoms, and Jin dynasty.

Late Eastern Han dynasty, Three Kingdoms, and Jin dynasty.

Three Kingdoms, Wei.

Western Jin dynasty.

Western Jin dynasty.

Sixteen Kingdoms period. Try as I might, I could only get my hands on this back image… boo hiss… but you can see how it still kind of adheres to the general look.

2 thoughts on “Sinology Sunday: December 6, 2015

  1. I have been wondering about the clothes. I noticed that they are multi-layered and drape to the floor. Obviously, they are not very conducive to daily living. Are those clothes worn mostly for ceremonies or by the middle/upper class ladies with servants holding up their train?

    • These clothes are probably more for the upper class so that probably explains why they don’t look the most conducive to movement.

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