I Am A Singer Ep. 9: Jess Lee eats cherry tomatoes

Crab people, crab people. Taste like crab, talk like people.

Crab people, crab people. Taste like crab, talk like people.

Malaysian singer Jess Lee gasps in surprise as television personality, Rolling Wang (not to be confused with annoying viral chicken video songstress Rollin Wang), rolls into her hotel room with a breakfast cart adorned with breads, milk and fruit. Her eyes remain fixed on the food as he greets her and wishes her a happy new year.

Is that a plate of cherry tomatoes? Who eats just cherry tomatoes?

Is that a plate of cherry tomatoes? Who eats just cherry tomatoes?

Li Jian and his manager, Shen Mengchen, are the first to arrive on the I Am A Singer set. He flicks on the TV to inspect the competition. “Jess Lee,” Shen muses, tapping the remote to reveal her song choice. “Suffering.”
“I’ve never heard that song before,” admits Li Jian. “Have you?”
“No, I haven’t. Let’s put it on now.”
This isn’t the first time a Chinese celebrity has claimed not to know Jess Lee.

Meanwhile, in the halls of HunanTV headquarters, Han Hong examines a poster of Jane Zhang wearing a stunning white and gold dress.

Meanwhile, in the halls of HunanTV headquarters, Han Hong examines a poster of Jane Zhang wearing a stunning white and gold dress.

Some of the contestants are taking naps on their sofas. Li Jian and The One, too tall for the furniture, dangle their limbs off the side. Han Hong fits snuggly within the arm rests.


Li Jian
Bonds 尘缘 by Roman Tam

Li Jian is looking rather snazzy. He’s wearing a charcoal suit with a purple crew-neck tee and pocket square. And a watch on his right hand, oddly enough. I am totally going to steal this look for my next business casual event (I think this qualifies as business casual).

Li Jian’s performances tend to be very hit or miss. This one’s a miss. It’s slow, with no real musical or vocal climax. And that’s typical Li Jian. But it doesn’t have that unique “oomph” that makes Li Jian’s good performances good. His better songs usually come when they’re less piano-driven. Unfortunately, this one is super pianoed-up. It’s altogether a bit dull.

Hey, there’s a Caucasian dude watching the show. I bet we’ll be seeing a lot of him tonight.

It's a good thing there's a white person in the audience. Otherwise, we wouldn't know if our opinions are valid or not.

It’s a good thing there’s a white person in the audience. Otherwise, we wouldn’t know if our opinions are valid or not.

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Photoshoot Round Up: Miscellaneous


When it rains, it pours.
Liu Yifei is in black veils fro Madame Figaro – wouldn’t it be nice if she had done more of those? Zhang Xinyi is in a winter wonderland, while Tong LIya is a killer businesswoman for Grazia. Jing Tian looks ready for summer, with her dresses and skirts. Liu Tao gives off the aura of a queen for Cosmopolitan, and Xu Jinglei is mature and cool. Meanwhile, Chen Xuedong adds in a little more testerone, and super model He Sui is eyecatching in black – who wins, her or Liu Yifei? Continue reading

The Four cast promotes with modern shoot

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Are their outfits really yellow and white? Or is it blue and black?

Why don’t we have a major “historical” detective transplanted in modern China yet? Because they would look so good, as shown by them in this post-modern (judging by the holographic yellow tape at the crime scene) photoshoot of The Four leads Zhang Han, William Chan, Yang Yang, and Mao Zijun.  The series is set to air next month once RoCH is over.   Also, since Yang Yang is in here, can we make it a musical, too?

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Huang Xiaoming’s “Cruel Romance” to Air March 3

Is it really that romantic to lay your head on your significant other’s shoulder? At least Huang Xiaoming isn’t playing piano like Hawick Lau was whenever Tang Yan did that to him in Lady & Liar.

The Republican-era romantic drama Cruel Romance (锦绣缘华丽冒险), starring Huang Xiaoming and Chen Qiao’en, has finally gotten an air date. The series will be broadcast on Hunan TV starting March 3, after The Legend of Fragrance finishes its run.

Based on the novel The Fate of Jinxiu (锦绣缘), Cruel Romance has been highly anticipated by fans of Huang Xiaoming and Chen Qiao’en, who had a brief collaboration in the movie Breaking the Waves (激浪青春). The drama is helmed by Taiwanese director Lin Helong, who is mostly known for Taiwanese idol dramas like Devil Beside You, Wish to See You Again, and Love or Bread.

Cruel Romance recently released its opening theme song, simply titled “Fate” (缘), which is sung by Huang Xiaoming. I usually like his songs because he tends to get good songwriters, but he’s definitely straining his voice in this one. *sigh* The lyrics were penned by the drama’s producers, Huan Yue and Huang Bin (who is also Xiaoming’s manager).

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Six faces of Fan Bingbing for Grazia

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If Fan Bingbing on the left and Fan Bingbing on the right acted opposite each other, it would be a pretty awesome show.

From childish to sexy to classy to  androgynous, Fan Bingbing shows  six faces of herself for  Grazia China’s 6th anniversary.    My only complaint is that the androgynous Fan Bingbing this time is not as hot as when she fought droids in the Unfollow ad, but it’ll do. Photos by Chen Man, who also did the Elle cover shoot with Fan Bingbing.

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I Am A Singer Ep. 8: Li Tarzan, Shoo Jane

A peculiarly dressed Jane Zhang is eliminated from the competition.

A peculiarly dressed Jane Zhang is eliminated from the competition. Who comes up with these headlines?

It was the Lunar New Year holiday last week, so our seven favourite singers have wandered off for a bit (happy new year to all of Cfensi’s wonderful readers, by the way).

Jane Zhang is in Beijing, not wearing make-up but still looking pretty, and preparing dinner. She says she hasn’t cooked in a long time. That’s probably why she holds her knife like she’s ironing a shirt. But I imagine she hasn’t ironed for herself in a long time either.

Sun Nan is in Sanya on Hainan Island, the “Hawaii of China,” where he demonstrates everything wrong with the Chinese entertainment industry today.
1) That’s a very wrong way of doing push-ups (Chinese celebrities don’t work out enough)
2) Vertical filming (there aren’t enough good cameramen working in Chinese television)

Awkwardly humping the sand is not a push-up.

Awkwardly humping the sand is not a push-up.

Tan Weiwei, like Jane, is in Beijing, drinking vegetable soup and munching on a carrot from a cardboard bowl. Her manager complains that she needs to eat more than just vegetables so she can put on weight.

The One is back in Korea, bringing Xiao Wu with him. They’ve ordered a whole stack of bento-like, dosirak takeout boxes, and The One is doing an awful lot of talking with his mouth full. You’d think all these celebrities would get nice fancy meals, but not so much.

A-Lin is in Taiwan, where she bumps into unsuccessful I Am A Singer challenger Li Ronghao. “Hey, you’re back?” he asks, reasoning that A-Lin must have been eliminated.
“I’m back!” she replies, perhaps not really getting that. She then bumps into Karen Mok, who says nice things to her, but is very clearly aware of who is the real A-lister between the two (it’s not A-Lin).

We don’t get to see Li Jian or Han Hong’s Spring Festival outings. Mysterious.

The I Am A Singer green room has a Chinese New Year tree with presents underneath it. I hope this doesn’t become a thing. I’m probably getting to that age where people feel comfortable about not getting you presents, so there’s no way I will benefit from this.
Oh, and Sun Nan takes over as host from Leo Ku, thus answering the question I’ve been asking for the past two weeks. But now who will host when Sun Nan leaves?


Han Hong
Olive Tree 橄榄树 by Chyi Yu

This episode is spending a lot of time on the introduction to this performance. Firstly, Tan Weiwei discovers that Han Hong is singing Olive Tree by Chyi Yu. “People always recommend that I sing this song, but I don’t dare to,” she says, citing the rhythm and timing of the song. “It’s really difficult.”
Meanwhile, Anson is helping out Han Hong with the arrangement. It’s probably part of his secret plan to get as much screentime as he can now so that the audience will vote him back in in the comeback round. Isn’t that the plot of the Chicago?

Han Hong tells the story of how her father died when she was young and her mother remarried. After that, she ran away to Beijing to find her grandmother, and hasn’t been with her mother since then. When her grandmother passed away, Han Hong was by herself, with no direction and no roots. Despite all this, there is still an olive tree in her heart, she says. That raises some horticultural questions.

Fellow Tibetan-ish singer Yangjima sang this song on Chinese Idol, where Han Hong is a judge. The performances are completely different so it’s hard to compare, but Han Hong’s is vocally more impressive. I can’t tell if her shoes are gold, or if they’re silver and it’s just the lighting that makes them look gold. The timing of the pause at the end is slightly off when the band starts playing before Han Hong starts singing. Tan Weiwei totally saw that coming. Continue reading

M.I.C. Jianci, Li Xiangxiang head Tiny Times the Musical

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Can you guess who’s who?

It’s ridiculous how good-looking even the musical cast for Guo Jingming‘s  Time Times is.

The male cast features M.I.C. Jianci, Chinese Idol winner Li Xiangxiang, singer Li Weifeng (Coke Lee), BangBangTang ex-member Wu Sixian, lead of Jin Sha the musical Zhang Qiyuan, China is Listening Third Place Ayunga (he’s my bet for Gongming),  and Chinese Idol contestant Zhang Jie. H.I.T.’s Duan Huangwei will also be in this.

Female leads include Nan Quan Mama‘s Lara, Super Girl Pan Chen (the first actual Shanghainese to play a Tiny Times lead),  and a bunch of Chinese Idol  contestants like Liu Sihan.

Oh, and they also with you a Happy Chinese New Year:

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